Henry Inman Portraits

keokuk

Keokuk (Sauk and Fox)

Keokuk was a Sauk chieftain who ruled the united Sauk and Fox (or Musquakee) nation. A well-respected horseman, Keokuk was established as a distinguished leader of the tribe after skillfully killing a Sioux warrior with a single spear while riding horseback. At a young age, Keokuk led a group of men into battle against an invasion of U.S. troops. In his book featuring portraits of tribal leaders, Thomas McKenney praised Keokuk as a bold yet enterprising man who "possesses an intimate knowledge of human nature."


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Keokuk (Sauk and Fox), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 7.2017

chippewa squaw

Chippewa Mother and Child (Chippewa)

Many women and other members of the Chippewa tribe traveled to Washington, DC, as part of a delegation. This portrait of a woman, identified only as a Chippewa mother, served to document the cultural differences between Native American and Euro-American cultures within the context of Thomas McKenney's project to archive Native American life.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Chippewa Squaw and Child (Chippewa), 1831–1833
Oil on canvas
Collection of Cousins Properties Incorporated, Atlanta, 316.2005

coosa tustunnuggee

Coosa-Tustunnuggee (Creek)

Coosa-Tustunnuggee served as a leader of the Upper Creek nation in 1827. Here, he wears a handmade coat typical of Creek leaders. Blue and red stripes are accented with black fringe and secured by a handwoven sash of red and black beads. The patterned headdress is topped by a headband of trade silver and imported ostrich feathers. The headdress, as well as the silver gorget and arm bands, are reminiscent of late eighteenth-century Creek formal wear, which relied heavily on such imported luxury goods.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Coosa-Tustunnuggee (Creek), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.115

david vann

David Vann (Cherokee)

David Vann worked to convince the Cherokee nation to relinquish their territory east of the Mississippi to the United States in hopes of avoiding a fatal forced relocation. He served as the assistant secretary to the Cherokee delegation and traveled to Washington to advocate for his people’s land rights. Vann was ultimately murdered alongside three other Cherokee leaders in what was labeled an "intertribal struggle for power" by the United States War Department.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
David Vann (Cherokee), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.116

neamathla

Nea-Mathla (Seminole)

Nea-Mathla consistently stunned Washington officials by refusing their offers, which tempted other chieftains. Perhaps most notable was his dismissal of a U.S. government offer to fund schools with Euro-American curricula for the children of the Seminole nation. Nea-Mathla instead advocated that Seminole children were to be instructed in Seminole customs, rejecting the planned assimilation of his people.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Nea-Mathla (Seminole), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.119

oche finceco

Oche Finceco (Creek)

Oche Finceco called himself Charles Cornells throughout his life because he identified with his mixed white and native heritage. He signed the 1826 Treaty of Washington, signifying his support of the Creek nation’s surrender of their territory in present-day Georgia to the United States in an attempt to avoid bloodshed.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Oche Finceco or Charles Cornells (Creek), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.114

pushmataha

Push-Ma-Ta-Ha (Choctaw)

Push-Ma-Ta-Ha lived on a Spanish settlement for five years after being attacked by a tribe known as the Callageheahs while hunting along the Red River. After he returned home, Push-Ma-Ta-Ha gathered some of his fellow Choctaw huntsmen and sought revenge on his attackers. His knack for warfare continued to develop as he led battles against the Creek and Seminole nations. He traveled to Washington in 1824, where he met the Marquis de Lafayette and President Monroe, though he died of illness a few days later.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Push-Ma-Ta-Ha (Choctaw), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.120

selocta

Selocta (Creek)

A Creek warrior and committed ally of the United States, Selocta served as a guide to General Andrew Jackson during his visit to the Creek nation. War between various factions of the Creeks favored Jackson’s agenda and enabled him to seize their land in present-day Georgia. Selocta aligned with Jackson throughout the battle over these lands, and he ultimately served alongside the United States army as a guide when the Creeks were relocated during the Trail of Tears.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Selocta (Creek), 1832–1833
Oil on canvas
Anonymous gift, 1984.173

shingaba

Shin-Ga-Ba-W'Ossin (Chippewa)

Shin-Ga-Ba-W’Ossin was a well-respected public speaker who consistently advocated for peace between native nations and the United States. Many respected his aloof demeanor, which empowered him to lead the Chippewa people through their final battle with the Fox, resulting in a lasting cooperation between the two nations.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Shin-Ga-Ba-W'Ossin (Chippewa), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.121

stidham

John Stidham or Eolo (Creek)

John Stidham, often called Eolo or John Stedman, was a well-respected Muscogee Creek leader of mixed race who traced his lineage back to Denmark. He traveled to the capital and sat for a portrait by Charles Bird King at the request of Thomas McKenney after signing the 1826 Treaty of Washington, which overturned an earlier treaty that had ceded the Creek nation’s territory to the United States with no reparations.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
John Stidham or Eolo (Creek), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.117

timpoochee

Timpoochee Barnard (Creek)

Renowned among the bravest warriors in the Creek War of 1814, Timpoochee Barnard led a fleet of Yuchi men into battle against the United States. The Yuchi, who later became a subset tribe of the Creek nation, were ultimately displaced after the Treaty of Fort Jackson claimed 23,000,000 acres of Creek land for the United States. Timpoochee Barnard sent his son, William Barnard, back to Washington with Thomas McKenney, the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, to receive an education.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Timpoochee Barnard (Creek), ca. 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.122

tooan_tuh

Tooan-Tuh or Spring Frog (Cherokee)

Perhaps one of the most praised hunters of the Cherokee nation, Tooan-Tuh, or Spring Frog, was a respected athlete, farmer, and trapper of game. In politics, he aligned himself with the United States; he served General Andrew Jackson in battle against the Creeks and ultimately was one of the first Cherokee leaders to leave his homeland and relocate west of Arkansas.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Tooan Tuh or Spring Frog (Cherokee), ca. 1831–1833
Oil on canvas
Anonymous gift, 1984.178

yahahajo

Yaha-Hajo (Seminole)

As the second principal war chief of the Seminole nation, Yaha-Hajo was recognized as a thoughtful leader and the most competitive hunter from the territory in what is now the state of Florida. He ultimately implored his people to disregard tempting financial propositions and refrain from selling their land to the United States. When removal became the only option for the Seminole nation, Yaha-Hajo was selected to inspect the western land allocated to his people.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Yaha-Hajo (Seminole), ca. 1836–1838
Oil on canvas
Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins, 2017.112

mathla

Julcee-Mathla (Seminole)

After leading the Seminole nation of the Everglades through several decades of war, Julcee-Mathla was granted permission by the U.S. War Department in 1842 to remain on his homeland alongside three hundred other Seminole people.


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
Julcee Mathla (Seminole), ca. 1831–1833
Oil on canvas
Anonymous gift, 1984.175

fox warrior

A Fox Warrior (Sauk and Fox)


Henry Inman
American, 1801–1846
A Fox Warrior (Sauk and Fox), 1831–1834
Oil on canvas
Collection of Cousins Properties Incorporated, Atlanta, 6.2017